Increasing the Efficiency of Public Health Campaigns

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Radio broadcast on air

As we discussed in class, managing public health and its policies is thought to be the jobs of public health professionals. However, my group’s archive of the Passing in Review’s public broadcast aired on KPRC radio in Houston in the 1940s is an attempt to increase the public’s participation in public health. Specifically, it deals with garnering more public participation towards donating blood to MD Anderson’s newly opened Blood Bank. Our project will aim to target the managers of public health campaigns. In doing so, the managers of public health campaigns will become more knowledgeable about creating an interactive dialogue between public health officials and the common people. Instead of making public health campaigns mere announcements of new policies, managers of public health campaigns will become familiar with the most efficient way to garner the attention, support, and participation of a large, diverse population.

In order to effectively demonstrate how to create this interactive dialogue, our project will evaluate how effective the Passing in Review radio broadcast was in trying to get more volunteers to donate blood. The form that our project will take is a formal presentation. In this formal presentation, our group will propose guidelines on how to effectively deliver public health campaigns in order to garner the most public participation. In our presentation, we will examine the efficiency of the Passing in Review radio broadcast by looking at the strengths and weaknesses of the blood donation campaign. Then, our group will suggest guidelines on how to further reach out to a broader population, which will hopefully increase public participation. We will also have a website and pamphlet that will have the information that was said during our formal presentation so that the managers of public health campaigns can easily look at our guidelines on how to increase public participation once the formal presentation ends.

An important aspect of our archive is that there were many factors that weren’t taken into consideration in the campaign to garner public participation in blood donation. For example, our archive was in the form of a radio broadcast. However, only people who were moderately wealthy in the 1940s could have access to the radio, which means that this radio broadcast may not have reached the entire population. Initially, a presentation to the managers of public health campaigns will give them the opportunity to listen to a short presentation that could help them widen the audience that public health campaigns may reach. Also, by having a website as well, it makes our guidelines much more accessible, to other managers of public health campaigns and the public itself. Unlike the radio broadcast in the 1940s, internet access is more widespread during this time period because even if you may not have a computer at home, a library easily has computers that could be accessed. This wider accessibility already reaches out to more people.

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Blood Banks require lots of public participation

We will need to do research on the target audience of the Passing in Review broadcast.  We will need to know what kind of audience had access to the radio broadcast. In order to do so, we will look through archival records of blood donations in order to see what kind of ethnic or socioeconomic groups tended to donate blood more often back in the 1940s. We will also need to pay attention to the environment at the time during the 1940s, which will help us see if there were any recent incidents in public health that may or may not have encouraged the radio broadcast’s target audience to donate blood to MD Anderson’s newly opened blood bank. We can find this information by also looking through archival historical records of events that may have happened at the time. Lastly, we will look at many different public health campaigns that deal with increasing blood donation participation and whether or not they were successful. We will research these campaigns on websites and radio broadcasts to gain more knowledge about which methods are more successful than others in order to create our guidelines on how to make public health campaigns more efficient.

Sources for pictures:

  1. Radio broadcast on air: http://www.goldenradio.nl/gastenboek.htm
  2. Blood bank: http://blood-banks.regionaldirectory.us/
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One thought on “Increasing the Efficiency of Public Health Campaigns

  1. Hi Hannah,

    I find your explanation of why choosing website, pamphlet, and presentation as the form of your project very interesting – the topic of your research intersects really well with this multimedia project and you actually apply it in your thinking of making the project most accessible to your audience.

    I also have a couple of questions regarding your archival project. Are there any other ways to assess the effectiveness of the radio campaign besides accessibility? You talked about outside research on the blood donors in the 1940s, which is a good way to identify the audience of the radio campaign, but how are you going to identify “most efficient way to garner the attention, support, and participation of a large, diverse population”? I’m really interested in that!

    Like

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